Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB)

Cavaterm information for Healthcare ProfessionalsHeavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a significant health problem in premenopausal women; it can reduce their quality of life and cause anaemia.1

One third of all women report heavy menstrual bleeding at some point in their lives, and in Western countries about 5 % of reproductive-aged women seek treatment for it annually.2

In over 50% of affected women no cause is found and the diagnosis of Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) is made. 3

Such statements and a lot of similar assertions are frequently reported in the literature available. They reveal how often you must be faced with patients complaining of bleeding disorders.

The classic definition of heavy menstrual bleeding, also called menorrhagia, is blood loss exceeding 80 ml per menstrual cycle, but this criteria is primarily used in research settings. In your practice, when a patient reports her periods to be so heavy or so long that it is interfering with her plans and activities, commonly causing stress and embarrassing incidents, she needs to be offered a solution.

You are of course aware that HMB is a common problem for women, which can seriously affect their quality of life. Being directly in contact with patients enduring bleeding disorders you know how to establish a diagnosis for each of your patients affected, then provide your patients with recommendations based on their medical conditions as well as personal expectations. You will lead your patient to the appropriate treatment and, in most cases, you will perform it. With Cavatermâ„¢ Veldana Medical SA offers you a safe and easy to use solution for your patients suffering from dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

 

References

1 Lethaby A, Hickey M, Garry R, Penninx J. Endometrial resection / ablation techniques for heavy menstrual bleeding. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD001501. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001501.pub3)
2 Hurskainen R, Grenman S, Komi I, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of menorrhagia. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86:749-757
3 Vessey M, Villard-MacKintosh L, McPherson K: The epidemiology of hysterectomy: Findings of a large cohort study. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 99:402-407, 1992

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